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The Department of Labor (together with the Treasury Department) has issued helpful deadline relief for participants and beneficiaries in health, disability, other welfare and pension plans, as well as for plan sponsors and administrators of such plans, during the COVID-19 National Emergency.  The guidance came just in time for plan administrators at risk of missing the deadline for distributing annual funding notices, which was April 29 this year.

Continue Reading DOL Issues COVID-Related Deadline Relief

In the third and final of a series, our employment and benefits teams take an in depth look at the provisions of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act” or the “Act”) affecting employment, compensation, payroll taxes and paid leave. Read more on the Mayer Brown COVID-19 Blog.

US employers are considering many alternatives to address the significant economic hardships caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. One such alternative is putting one or more groups of employees on furlough—a low paid or unpaid leave of absence. However, now more than ever, employers must carefully address health plan coverage during a furlough. See our Legal

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act, signed into law on March 18, 2020, is a  significant piece of federal legislation addressing the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.  Among its many provisions is a broad requirement that group health plans and health insurance issuers provide coverage for COVID-19 testing without any cost sharing, prior authorization,

For an update on the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which requires coverage of testing without cost sharing effective March 18, 2020, see our blog entry.

In an effort to remove barriers to testing for and treatment of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), the Internal Revenue Service today issued Notice 2020-15. The Notice

The Affordable Care Act contains a provision–the so-called “Cadillac tax”–providing for a 40% exciClassic Cadillacse tax on high cost employer-sponsored health coverage.  The bar for “high cost” is fairly low, and the Cadillac tax is ultimately expected to apply to a significant number of employer-sponsored health plans.

Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act, many employers and insurers (who would be responsible for paying the tax) have actively opposed the implementation of the Cadillac tax provisions, with moderate success.  The Cadillac tax was originally slated to take effect in 2018, but its implementation has been delayed twice–most recently until 2022. 


Continue Reading Cadillac Tax Repeal on the Horizon?

FICA’s special timing rule for account balance plans is oft-misunderstood – and misapplied – which can lead to unfavorable consequences for employers and employees alike.  Partner Debbie Hoffman and senior associate Stephanie Vasconcellos recently revisited the rule, conducting an in-depth analysis for Bloomberg BNA’s Tax Management Compensation Planning Journal.  Access the full article at www.bna.com

HSA

On March 5, 2018, the IRS announced adjustments – effective immediately – to various annual limitations already in place for 2018.  One such adjustment is to the maximum annual health savings account contribution for a family with high deductible health coverage.  Previously set at $6,900 for 2018, the IRS has lowered the limit to $6,850,